A list of reference material for Hekate research.

Syncretic Egyptian / Graeco-Roman magic from the collection of texts known as the Papyri Graecae Magicae.
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monsnoleedra
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Re: A list of reference material for Hekate research.

Post#11 » Thu Feb 28, 2019 10:58 am

Here's another resource to add to the list.

N. E. Akyürek Şahin, The Cult of Hecate in Lydia: Evidence from the Manisa Museum, Gephyra 13, 2016, 1-48.

In this article, the cult of Hecate in Lydia is examined on the basis of both the Hecate monuments housed in the Manisa Museum and those whose Lydian origin is asserted by publications. The mo¬numents have been compiled in a catalogue and described archaeologically; they are com-mented on from the point of view of their significance for the cult of Hecate in Lydia. The cata-logue is divided into 5 parts: 1. The monuments whose provenance is established, 2. The monu-ments whose provenance remains unknown, 3. The monuments outside the museum, 4. Coins, 5. Two other monuments that may be related to Hecate. Till now only two inscriptions concerning the cult have been attested in Lydia (see cat. no. 6 and 8). Apart from the inscriptions, there are Hecateia and stelai and reliefs which depict the goddess. At the end we can state that the worship of Hecate is not particularly prevalent in Lydia. However, nearly 20 examples provide evidence for the existence of the goddess’ veneration in this region. Their find spots are Philadelphia, Maionia, Satala, Thyateira, Sardis, Kollyda and Sidas. By relying on their provenance, one can suggest that there were cultic places or local temples in the cities of Philadelphia and Maionia, and even in the countryside of Thyateira. We can learn from these monuments that the goddess was not wor-shipped in the whole of Lydia, but especially in the eastern parts of the region (north-western Lydian, i.e. the south of Mysia Abbaïtis). It is argued that this situation can be explained by the influences of Phrygian cult and culture on Lydia. In the west of Lydia, where this influence was not so strong and where Hellenization was very extensive, evidence for the cult of Hecate was quite scarce. Nearly all the monuments in this article date from the 2nd century A.D.
Keywords: Hecate; Lydia; Manisa Museum; Hecateion; Mysia Abbaïtis.


https://www.academia.edu/25729575/N._E. ... _2016_1-48
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Re: A list of reference material for Hekate research.

Post#12 » Wed Mar 06, 2019 11:09 am

Here's another's Thesis research project that can be added to your material on Hekate library.

Reflections on the Enigmatic Goddess: The Origins of Hekate and the Development of her Character to the End of the Fifth Century B.C.

This is a study aimed at reconsidering the origins, in the broadest sense of the word, of the ancient goddess Hekate. To the best of our knowledge, what is the geographical provenance of Hekate? What does the evidence for the goddess up to the end of the fifth century B.C. tell us about the development of her character in the Greek religious world? Why did Hekate acquire such frightening and evil connections to the supernatural and black magic by this point? Although several theories have been proposed about the origin of Hekate, a Karian provenance remains the most likely, notwithstanding the Hellenistic date of the evidence that is normally cited. Tenuous links and methodological flaws characterise the theories that she was Mycenaean or Mesopotamian, while the Thracian theory rests on a fallacious assumption that Hekate evolved from the Thracian Bendis. The Karian theory is propped up by a variety of data that allows us to draw back incrementally the date to which Hekate’s worship in the region may be assigned. Evidence until the end of the fifth century is chronologically dichotomous: the earliest evidence, Hesiod’s Theogony, depicts a great, benevolent goddess, while evidence from the second half of the fifth century characterizes Hekate as a malevolent deity connected to ghosts, witchcraft, and sorcery who could and would occasion grievous harm to people, especially parturient women or newborns. This aspect of Hekate’s divinity in relation to women’s transitions and the failure thereof seems to have become particularly pronounced following her introduction to the Panhellenic pantheon and her mythic subordination to Artemis. But did the goddess ever bear inherent connections to the dead, despite Hesiod’s glowing Hymn to her? Milesian archaeological evidence suggests she might have. However, it was the acquisition of magical properties that ultimately extinguished much of Hekate’s benevolence. It seems most likely that the Thessalian reputation for black magic, which was a direct result of medism in 485 and 480 B.C., was causative of this, given Hekate’s close association with the Thessalian Enodia.


There is a link for a downloadable PDF file
https://ourarchive.otago.ac.nz/handle/10523/4763
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Re: A list of reference material for Hekate research.

Post#13 » Fri May 15, 2020 10:12 pm

Haven't updated this for awhile so figured I'd add these.

Books, Articles and Various for Hekate / Hecate reference
Section 1: Books


37. The Trve Grimore: Encyclopaedia Goetica Vol 1, Bibliotheque Rouge MMX, Jake Stratton-Kent (start pg 283 – section Astaroth and Hecate)

Section 1a: Books more LHP in focus

06. The Infernal Faces of Hekate by Sean Woodward & Edgar Kerval + The Black Witch Songs (CD) , 2015, Sirius Limited Esoterica, 71 pages (55 copies)
- Somewhat of an expensive book to obtain in general. There is a more limited edition that is available with more items at a greater price. There are references to Kenneth Grant's Hecate's Fountain and some of the author's personal idea's and workings and associated sigils.

07. Hecate’s Fountain by Kenneth Grant, 1992, Skoob Publishing, ISBN 1 87143896 9, Hillman Printers (Frome) LTD, 272 pgs
- New Issis Temple - Typhonian Triologies #6
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Re: A list of reference material for Hekate research.

Post#14 » Sun Jul 12, 2020 8:23 pm

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Though I'd talk about this particular book.

Series: Monsters of Mythology: Hecate
Hardcover: 88 pages
Publisher: Chelsea House Pub (September 1, 1988)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1555462529
ISBN-13: 978-1555462529
Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 0.5 x 9.5 inches

To be honest this is one book I had never actually read. Seen reviews of it, and it's one that people place either as a messed up story or a completely worthless book. After reading it I have to agree. Other than the benefit of having it in my collection and being able to actually say I read it, it was not a positive addition.

The author has painted Hecate as the Queen of the Harpies and Hades right hand demoness in that regard. She is the daughter of an Falcon nymph and an Egyptian Panther God and it goes down from there. The complete work is a fabricated mixture of aspects of several Hellene stories weaved together but stays true to none of them.

As a devotee to Hekate it's a novelty item to have in my collection of reference material. Worthwhile simply due to others occasionally referencing it at times. However, as a valid and legitimate reference or source item it would not be a suitable item in my opinion beyond its novelty appeal.
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talerman
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Re: A list of reference material for Hekate research.

Post#15 » Tue Jul 21, 2020 3:59 am

I think the one who ought to write a book about Hekate is you, Monsnoleedra.
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Re: A list of reference material for Hekate research.

Post#16 » Wed Jul 22, 2020 6:10 am

I'm putting this here simply because the weird Sisters from the play Hamlet are often listed as an inspiration / source listing for Hekate / Hecate for literature. It doesn't directly focus upon Hekate / Hecate as the goddess herself but focuses upon her more as an inspiration for both a namesake and a "witch" in Elizabethan England. It's the play "THE WITCH" Thomas MIddleton. Written approximately 1613-1616. It's also important because many believe that the Hekate parts of "HAMLET" actually were later inclusions into the story and come from THE WITCH and incorporated by Thomas Middleton.

The Witch
The Scene: Ravenna

The Persons
DUKE
L[ORD] GOVERNOR
SEBASTIAN, contracted to Isabella
FERNANDO, his friend
ANTONIO, husband to Isabella
ABBERZANES, a gentleman, neither honest, wise, nor valiant
ALMACHILDES, a fantastical gentleman
GASPERO }
HERMIO } servants to Antonio
FIRESTONE, the clown and Hecate's son
[BOY]
DUCHESS
ISABELLA, niece to the governor [and wife to Antonio]
FRANCISCA, Antonio's sister
AMORETTA, the Duchess's woman
FLORIDA, a courtesan
[An OLD WOMAN]
HECATE, the chief witch
[Five other] witches, [including] STADLIN, HOPPO, [PUCKLE and HELLWAIN]
[MALKIN, a spirit like a cat]
Other Witches and Servants, Mutes


https://tech.org/~cleary/witch.html
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Re: A list of reference material for Hekate research.

Post#17 » Wed Jul 22, 2020 6:18 am

Nice addition Mons, love the cultural expansion to the materials. Tho wasn't Hekate incorporated into the Scottish play?

Mebbe we could start charging for this thread ... Miller and Grayle are getting $700 a pop. Hell, at $500 we could pay for the hosting and distribute a bit to the contributors. :thinking

:rofl :rofl :rofl

EDIT to add:

Oh, I had no idea she was so relatively important to Will:

Hecate was a Greek goddess associated with witchcraft and the moon. She was a significant figure for Shakespeare: in addition to this line in Hamlet, he refers to her in Macbeth, King Henry VI, Part 1, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and King Lear.
(Shakespeare's use of Hecate)

EDIT 2:

Or mebbe Thomas Middleton, Shakespearean actor:

Macbeth Glossary

O well done! I commend your pains...you put in. (4.1.39-43)

Hecate O well done! I commend your pains;
And every one shall share i' the gains;
And now about the cauldron sing,
Live elves and fairies in a ring,
Enchanting all that you put in. (4.1.39-43)
[Music and a song: 'Black spirits,' etc, Hecate retires]

It is likely this passage (and all of 3.5) was inserted at a later date, possibly by Thomas Middleton. Shakespearean scholar A. C. Bradley explains:
These passages have been suspected (1) because they contain stage-directions for two songs which have been found in Middleton's Witch; (2) because they can be excised without leaving the least trace of their excision; and (3) because they contain lines incongruous with the spirit and atmosphere of the rest of the Witch-scenes: e.g. III. v. 10 f.:

all you have done
Hath been but for a wayward son,
Spiteful and wrathful, who, as others do,
Loves for his own ends, not for you;

and IV. i. 41, 2:

And now about the cauldron sing,
Like elves and fairies in a ring.

The idea of sexual relation in the first passage, and the trivial daintiness of the second (with which cf. III. v. 34,
Hark! I am call'd; my little spirit, see,
Sits in a foggy cloud, and stays for me)

suit Middleton's Witches quite well, but Shakespeare's not at all; and it is difficult to believe that, if Shakespeare had meant to introduce a personage supreme over the Witches, he would have made her so unimpressive as this Hecate. (It may be added that the original stage-direction at IV. i. 39, 'Enter Hecat and the other three Witches,' is suspicious.)

I doubt if the second and third of these arguments, taken alone, would justify a very serious suspicion of interpolation; but the fact, mentioned under (1), that the play has here been meddled with, trebles their weight. And it gives some weight to the further fact that these passages resemble one another, and differ from the bulk of the other Witch passages, in being iambic in rhythm. (It must, however, be remembered that, supposing Shakespeare did mean to introduce Hecate, he might naturally use a special rhythm for the parts where she appeared.)

The same rhythm appears in a third passage which has been doubted: IV. i. 125-132. But this is not quite on a level with the other two; for (1), though it is possible to suppose the Witches, as well as the Apparitions, to vanish at 124, and Macbeth's speech to run straight on to 133, the cut is not so clean as in the other cases; (2) it is not at all clear that Hecate (the most suspicious element) is supposed to be present. The original stage-direction at 133 is merely 'The Witches Dance, and vanish'; and even if Hecate had been present before, she might have vanished at 43, as Dyce makes her do (400-1).
(Hecate potentially a later interpolation into Shakespeare)
Cheers,

Prov

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monsnoleedra
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Re: A list of reference material for Hekate research.

Post#18 » Wed Jul 22, 2020 6:36 am

Provenant wrote:Nice addition Mons, love the cultural expansion to the materials. Tho wasn't Hekate incorporated into the Scottish play?

Mebbe we could start charging for this thread ... Miller and Grayle are getting $700 a pop. Hell, at $500 we could pay for the hosting and distribute a bit to the contributors. :thinking

:rofl :rofl :rofl

EDIT to add:

Oh, I had no idea she was so relatively important to Will:

Hecate was a Greek goddess associated with witchcraft and the moon. She was a significant figure for Shakespeare: in addition to this line in Hamlet, he refers to her in Macbeth, King Henry VI, Part 1, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and King Lear.
(Shakespeare's use of Hecate)


You did get me though I was thinking of MacBeth when I wrote Hamlet. Weird Sisters are in Macbeth not Hamlet Should never try to write when you've been up all night
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Dominus
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Re: A list of reference material for Hekate research.

Post#19 » Wed Jul 22, 2020 6:43 am

Still love the cultural expansion, and you sent me down the rabbit hole to learn that she's in more than just Hamlet and MacBeth.

Seems like there's an interesting story there, that Shakespeare had an interest in Hekate (Or maybe not if it's Middleton). Is that a strike in favor of Shakespeare being a nom de plume of say Francis Bacon? (Was Shakespeare a pen name?)
Cheers,

Prov

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monsnoleedra
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Re: A list of reference material for Hekate research.

Post#20 » Wed Jul 22, 2020 7:35 am

Provenant wrote:Still love the cultural expansion, and you sent me down the rabbit hole to learn that she's in more than just Hamlet and MacBeth.

Seems like there's an interesting story there, that Shakespeare had an interest in Hekate (Or maybe not if it's Middleton). Is that a strike in favor of Shakespeare being a nom de plume of say Francis Bacon? (Was Shakespeare a pen name?)


I remember taking a 300 level literature course in college on Shakespeare and the Globe Theatre. The idea of Shakespeare, his true identity and who else might have actually written his works came up. That was an interesting discussion / debate. Learnt a few things in that course, one was hardly any true copies survived of the actual plays. That and most roles for women were actually performed by young boys. Victorian & Elizabethan England was not to kind to women in the theater.

Another British author / poet that uses Hekate directly or indirectly is John Keats. In one poem "ON THE SEA" she is called by name. In another, "TO HOMER" she is referred to as Diana, queen of Earth, Heaven and Hell.

On The Sea is sort of interesting to me in that Hekate is implied as the moon. Yet it also is about Sailors on the sea. So it could be seen as addressing her influence both as the moon and her influence upon the sea. Something she holds dominion over from a celestial and oceanic perspective. Of course that is just my reading of it so others could differ. But I seldom find anything that even suggests an oceanic influence.
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